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Remember, remember the Fifth of November

It’s that time of year again and whilst we don’t want to dampen the spirit, we have some great tips to help you stay safe.

Sparkle safely!

Sparklers can be perceived as harmless fireworks. However they actually burn at very high temperatures and therefore can cause serious damage and injuries. When handling sparklers remember to,

  • Always light one sparkler at a time. Lighting several at a time will increase the risk of creating a flare up.
  • Wear gloves when handling sparklers. This will reduce the risk of burning your hands.
  • When sparklers are lit, hold them at arm’s length and ensure you remain a safe distance from others.
  • Don’t light sparklers near any other fireworks you may have. This increases the risk of fire.
  • When the sparkler is finished, put it in a bucket of cold water. Sparklers retain their temperature even after they have been extinguished. Emerging them in cold water will reduce the temperature quickly.

Check out our favourite recipe for Bonfire Banoffee Pie!

Ingredients:

  • 300g Ginger nut biscuits or digestives
  • 100g Butter
  • 5 Bananas (Peel, Slice Lengthways, then in half)
  • 1 X 397g tin Carnation Caramel
  • 3 x 200g Bags of Marshmallows

Method:

  1. Line the base of a 21cm loose bottomed tart tin (3.5cm deep) with nonstock baking paper. Blitz the biscuits in a food processor until they reach a fine crumb with the melted butter and spoon into the tin. Use the back of a spoon to press the biscuits into the base and up to the side. Chill in the fridge for 30minutes.
  2. Lay the bananas on the base in an even layer. Spoon the caramel into a bowl, stir well until smooth, then pour evenly over the bananas, to the top of the biscuit case. Chill for a further 30minuntes.
  3. Preheat the grill to high. Arrange the marshmallows on top, starting with an even layer all over, then pile up to 2 or 3 high in the centre. Grill for 15 secs or until gooey and brown on top. Decorate cake with sparklers if you like.

Ghoulishly good tips to help prepare you and your home for Halloween!

Halloween Travel Tips

If you travel on the roads this Halloween we advise you use extra caution to protect yourself, fellow passengers and others around you.

  • When traveling through neighbourhoods and poorly lit areas, use the utmost caution and drive slowly. Children’s movements can be unpredictable. Additionally their costume may make them less visible to you.
  • Avoid distraction whilst driving by putting your all devices away, this will reduce all temptation to take glances.
  • If you are wearing a costume that restricts your movement or view, take it off for the duration of your journey.

A scarily safe pumpkin

Using a candle to illuminate your well carved pumpkin can be dangerous, Halloween costumes and paper decorations can easily catch fire. Therefore consider using a battery powered candle or alternatively a toy jack-o’-lantern. Both will provide you with a seriously spooky yet safe glow.

Trick or Treat?

Whilst nearly all trick or treaters are harmless children eager to gather as many sweets as they can, it’s important you remain vigilant when answering your door. Halloween costumes can be deceiving, therefore if you have an particularly uneasy feeling about the person behind the mask, don’t open the door!

Sitting this Halloween out?

No problem, but don’t turn the lights out!! Yes a well lit house may well attract little monsters, however it will likely dissuade potential thieves!

Check out our favourite recipe for toffee apples below!

Ingredients:

  • 8 Apples
  • 400g caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vinegar
  • 4 tbsp golden syrup
  • 6 drops of red food colouring (optional)

Method:

  1. Remove the wax coating on your apples and place them in a bowl.
  2. Cover the apples in boiling water. After 30 seconds remove the apples and remove the stalks and place the apples on a wooden skewer.
  3. To make the toffee, pour the sugar into a saucepan. Add 100ml water and set over a medium heat until the sugar dissolves, then add the golden syrup and vinegar. Use a spoon to pour a little toffee into a bowl of cold water. When it’s ready it will harden instantly. If the toffee is still soft, continue to heat.
  4. Carefully and quickly pick up each apple using the stick and dip it into the toffee. Rotate each apple in the hot toffee until fully covered, drain for a few seconds then place onto baking paper with the sticks facing up and vertical.
  5. Leave to cool, then enjoy!

Cycling can be a risky business!

With our Corporate Ambassador, Mark Beaumont now back in one piece (broken tooth and fractured elbow aside!), from his World Cycle, we have considered the potential hazards of this ever-growing sport.  Before we embark on a cycle or car journey most people undertake a mental Risk Assessment without even realising it. Things to do, things to take with you, things to avoid!

From a cycling point of view Hazards can include:-

Traffic

There are many other road users out there – cars, vans, trucks and other cyclists.  In the event of a cycling race controls could include route planning to avoid heavy traffic/ large vehicles etc.

Wearing the right kit is essential.  Should there be an incident having a qualified First Aider available with appropriate Fist Aid kit would be required. On any distance event, falls are inevitable and plans must be in place on how to deal with these, patch up the rider and get them back in the race.

 

 

Weather

We can’t control the weather or avoid it however tyre choice, appropriate waterproof clothing and changes of clothing being available can make a big difference to performance. Aerodynamic equipment, helmet, cycle frame, wheels etc will reduce the drag of head winds.

Mechanical Failure

The condition of a bike is critical to performance.   Appropriate tyres for the road surface of the stage or journey, available spare wheels to deal with punctures as quickly as possible, spare brake pads, lubricants and tools should all be available to make adjustments.  Daily servicing of the cycle will ensure the optimum machine reliability.

Fatigue

When fatigue sets in mistakes happen and there is an increased risk of falls / collisions. Nutrition and hydration are key.  Mark had to take in 9000 calories per day to ensure he was able to perform at the top of his game.   In cycle races on closed roads food and water can be passed from a car window. On public roads that is very dangerous so passing energy drinks / food to the rider by a support pedestrian as the rider passes at an agreed location is much more manageable.

In addition, good communication systems are required to get feedback from the rider as to how they are feeling. Planned breaks must be built into the journey and assessed as the trip continues to ensure they are effective.   Companion riders can be brought into the ride at appropriate times to help pull the solo cyclist along.

Injury

As with any sport it is critical to maintain peak physical condition.   Warm up at the beginning of a journey and warm down towards the end or after a stage. Whilst you may not be cycling 18,000 miles (!)  you may be taking part in an endurance event so having physios available for massage and treatment every day would be an important part of the regime.

For further information on our Risk Management services, please contact our Risk Management Consultant, Nick Morrall – 07977 559504 or [email protected]